Self-esteem

My thinking today will cause me to be at total peace with myself. (Repost)

Posted on 3+000022. Filed under: 20/20 Vision: Changing Your Life by Changing the Way You See Things, Bishop Jim Earl Swilley, Blogs by Jim Swilley, Books by Bishop Jim Swilley, Emotional healing, Jim Earl Swilley, perception is reality, philosophy of life, Positive Affirmations, Self-esteem, self-image, Stress | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 

 

If you want to live in the kind of peace that prevents you from developing a stomach ulcer or hypertension – the peace that allows you to really sleep well at night – you must learn how to properly see yourself. Developing the proper self-image includes learning to forgive yourself and making a quality decision to stop blaming yourself and mentally beating yourself up for your mistakes and perceived failures. If you constantly bombard your spirit with negative thoughts of regret and self-accusation, those thoughts will eventually mutate into a kind of self-loathing that is completely counterproductive to your having any real degree of success in your life.

 

 

Low self-esteem is a learned habit that is usually developed by believing in lies and falsehoods. Insecurity and feelings of inferiority are also merit-less mindsets that people acquire and cultivate throughout the course of their lives. The fear of rejection is the result of learned behavior, as well. But the good news is that any learned behavior can be unlearned! When you know who you are, you don’t have to waste time trying to prove to somebody else that you are valuable or talented. You can believe in yourself while being fully aware and accepting of your own limitations.

                                                                   

no stressBeing at peace with yourself comes from a balanced estimate of your self. The more that you are at peace with yourself, the less stress you will have in your life. Guard your heart and never let someone else’s negative words decide the direction of your life. No one should have more power over you than you, and you can determine your own stress level and how much pressure you will allow yourself to feel in a day. If you want peace, you can have peace. You are in the driver’s seat, so determine where you want to go, emotionally, and don’t waver from your intended course. Get a vision of a more confident, more centered you, and become that person.

 

 

peace_mindNo matter what has happened to you in the past, you can get it together if you want to. Being at peace with oneself is something that should be aspired to, treasured and protected. Your peace is stronger than your fluctuating moods or temporary thoughts of discouragement. Being at peace will positively affect your health and could even lengthen your life in the long run. It certainly will make you easier to live with and will condition you to have better relationships and live a more successful life. When your mind is at peace, you see things more clearly and with better perspective; you are less likely to become overwhelmed by your circumstances. You can change your life by changing the way you see things.

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I will see the humor in a potentially negative situation and will not take the things that happen today too seriously.

Posted on 6+000011. Filed under: 20/20 Vision: Changing Your Life by Changing the Way You See Things, Books by Bishop Jim Swilley, Laughter, Peptide neurotransmitters, Self-esteem | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

laughing_faceLaughter puts things in perspective.  Having a sense of humor about the events that occur in your life every day really helps you to see things more clearly.  James Thurber said: “Humor is emotional chaos remembered in tranquility.”  Mark Twain said. “Humor is the great thing, the saving thing.  The minute it crops up, all our irritation and resentments slip away, and a sunny spirit takes their place.”  Mel Brooks stated that “Humor is just another defense against the universe,” while Groucho Marx said that “Humor is reason gone mad.”  The common thread in every attempted definition of humor is that it shapes and reshapes perspective and defines perception.

 

We certainly know that humor, especially as it is released in laughter, is something that possesses healing properties for the mind and for the physical body.  ‘A happy heart is a good medicine and a cheerful mind works healing, but a broken spirit dries up the bones” (Proverb 17:22 – AMP).  Some studies have shown that a good, hearty laugh can be as restorative to the body as a full eight hours of quality sleep and can significantly boost your immune system.  Some have even testified that they were literally cured of diseases through daily, extended periods of laughter via exposure to humorous material, and there is a good bit of scientific evidence to back up their claims.


 

 

“We all operate in two contrasting modes, which might be called open and closed.  The open mode is more relaxed, more receptive, more exploratory, more democratic, more playful and more humorous.  The closed mode is the tighter, more rigid, more hierarchical, more tunnel-visioned.  Most people, unfortunately, spend most of their time in the closed mode.  Not that the closed mode cannot be helpful.  If you are leaping a ravine, the moment of takeoff is a bad time for considering alternative strategies.  When you charge the enemy machine-gun post, don’t waste time trying to see the funny side of it.  Do it in the “closed” mode.  But the moment the action is over, try to return to the “open” mode – to open your mind again to all the feedback from our action that enables us to tell whether the action has been successful, or whether further action is needed to improve on what we have done.  In other words, we must return to the open mode, because in that mode we are the most aware, most receptive, most creative, and therefore at our most intelligent.”

– John Cleese

 

Laughter does release certain peptide neurotransmitters in the brain called endorphins that have very effective pain-relieving properties, but the most important function of a sense of humor involves mental perception.  A sense of humor has the ability to make you take a second look at a situation, especially a negative one, and see it in a completely different light.  By being able to laugh at yourself, you actually can increase self-esteem, boost your sense of self-worth, and bring the inner image of yourself into proper balance.  Laughter keeps us in the open mode where we are able to see ourselves and the world around us in a more positive light and not be weighed down by our perceived troubles.

 

Because the Bible has been so misunderstood and misinterpreted, most of its readers don’t realize that when Jesus used phrases like “you strain at gnats and swallow camels” or “don’t try to get a splinter out of your brother’s eye when you have a 2×4 in your own eye,” He was actually using absurdist humor to get His point across.  These concepts may not get a chuckle out of our jaded, modern, western sensibilities, but you can be assured that when He originally said them His audiences responded with laughter.  Don’t take everything so seriously and you’ll be able to better hear these and other spiritual concepts.  You can change you life by changing the way you see things.

 

 

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Changing Your Life by Changing the Way You See Things

Posted on 5+000011. Filed under: 20/20 Vision: Changing Your Life by Changing the Way You See Things, Books by Bishop Jim Swilley, laws of attraction, order @ www.churchinthenow.org, perception is reality, philosophy of life, Positive Affirmations, Self-esteem, self-image, vision | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

20-20-visionYou can, in fact, change your life by changing the way that you see things.  It has been theorized that there is no such thing as reality, there is only perception—a premise that can be argued, ad infinitum, by philosophers and physicists, alike.  Whether or not it is actually and completely true, the fact remains that your perception of things really does determine how you think, feel and function every single day of your life.  It is a fact that God is, but it is also a fact that God is to you how you see that He is.

 

You can determine your own happiness by learning how to properly view and discern the circumstances of your past and present.  By learning how to see yourself correctly, you can become the person you’ve always really wanted to be or, better yet, you can reveal the best “you” that you already are.  You have the ability to choose an attitude and vision for each day with the same confidence and ease that you have when choosing what to have for breakfast in the morning or what clothes to wear for the day.  The more you are able to see how inner sight creates daily realities, the better skilled you will become in using it to your advantage.

 

Free your mind, open the eyes of your heart and prepare to change your life for the better.  You can be happy. You can succeed.  You can stop second-guessing your life choices, living in regret or blaming others.  You can break all the limitations of your own mind and tap into an inner power that will enable you to do things that you never thought you could do before.  And you can do it all by simply choosing to change your viewpoint and perception of the things pertaining to your life.  As you begin to realize personal transformation, let these words take on new meaning for you: I once was lost, but now am found; was blind, but now I see!

 

[A separate 20/20 VISION Workbook is also available.]

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Optical Illusions

Posted on 3+000004. Filed under: 20/20 Vision: Changing Your Life by Changing the Way You See Things, Books by Bishop Jim Swilley, perception is reality, Self-esteem, self-image | Tags: , , , , , |

 

The fundamental convictions that you hold about your own identity, value, or worth as an individual, which are realistic but positive, are generally valid. But the beliefs that you maintain which produce negative inner pictures very probably result from your own self-imposed, internal optical illusions.

Very few people in life ever really hold a completely accurate picture of themselves in their own minds. We tend to believe what others tell us about ourselves, either verbally or subliminally, and, therefore, live out a good part of our time using information that has been obtained by the observance of a wrong, mental self-portrait.

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Posted on 3+000002. Filed under: Books by Bishop Jim Swilley, Self-esteem | Tags: , , , , , |

Low self-esteem is a learned habit that is usually developed by believing in lies and falsehoods. Insecurity and feelings of inferiority are also merit-less mindsets that people acquire and cultivate throughout the course of their lives. The fear of rejection is the result of learned behavior, as well. But the good news is that any learned behavior can be unlearned! When you know who you are, you don’t have to waste time trying to prove to somebody else that you are valuable or talented. You can believe in yourself while being fully aware and accepting of your own limitations. Being at peace with yourself comes from a balanced estimate of your self.

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